UCSB EEMB SEMINAR SERIES

By doing so, we can learn when the parts came together and perhaps understand why they stayed together. Learning how complex traits like eyes originate is fundamental for understanding evolution. Host-pathogen interactions for emerging infectious diseases: To address them, I propose a research program to break complex traits into components and study the individual evolutionary histories of those parts. Skip to main content. The impact of white-nose syndrome offers broad insight into continental patterns of species abundance and distribution, and comparisons of infection patterns in endemic regions with those in invading and established regions of North America illustrate how some populations of bats may persist with this pathogen. The introduction of pathogens to new regions and naive populations has had enormous effects on wildlife, livestock and human health.

I will show that the intensity of yearly epidemics of West Nile virus in humans are governed by a combination of immunity and climate that make spatial predictions of where potential future epidemics will occur possible. Next, I will articulate four open questions about trait origins. The introduction of pathogens to new regions and naive populations has had enormous effects on wildlife, livestock and human health. I hypothesize that photo-stress could have increased the chance those genes were expressed together in places on animals where light was abundant. However, I will also show that the virulence of this virus is not constrained by host mortality and that fitness in an avian host is selecting for the most virulent forms of the virus. The dynamics and impacts of introduced pathogens in the introduced regions are determined by ecological and evolutionary interactions among hosts, the pathogen, and the environment. I apply the approach to five structural innovations critical for complex eyes, reviewing the history of the parts of some of those innovations. To address them, I propose a research program to break complex traits into components and study the individual evolutionary histories of those parts.

  CUCIRCA CRIMINAL MINDS SEASON 8 EPISODE 8

By doing so, we can learn when the parts came together and perhaps understand why they stayed together. I will present data that illustrate these interactions in two systems – West Nile virus in birds and white-nose eemg in bats.

Photoreceptors evolved within animals by bricolage, recombining genes that originated far earlier. You are here Events.

Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology | University of California, Santa Barbara

Events Archive 10 18 40 39 Skip to main content. I apply the approach seriies five structural innovations critical for complex eyes, reviewing the history of the parts of some of those innovations. You are here Events.

Skip to main content.

I will show that the intensity of yearly epidemics of West Nile virus in humans are governed by a combination of immunity and climate that make spatial predictions of where potential future epidemics will occur possible. However, I will also show that the virulence of this virus is not constrained by host mortality and that fitness in an avian host is selecting for the most virulent forms of the virus.

The impact of white-nose syndrome offers broad insight into continental patterns of species abundance and distribution, and comparisons of infection patterns in endemic regions with those in invading and established regions of North America illustrate how some populations of bats may persist with this pathogen.

  WATCH RUPAUL S06E05

Finally, I will describe some recent efforts to develop tools to conserve bats impacted by this disease.

EEMB Events

Events Archive 10 18 40 39 I will first sketch historical perspectives on trait origins and argue that new technologies offer key new insights. Learning how complex traits like eyes originate is fundamental for understanding evolution.

I hypothesize that photo-stress could have increased the chance those genes were expressed together in places on animals where light was abundant. Date and Location Monday March 28, 4: Host-pathogen interactions for emerging infectious diseases: Next, I will articulate four open questions about trait origins.

The introduction of pathogens to new regions and naive populations has had enormous effects on wildlife, livestock and human health. To address them, I propose a research program to break complex traits into components and study the individual evolutionary histories of those parts. The dynamics and impacts of introduced pathogens in the introduced regions seriess determined by ecological and evolutionary interactions among hosts, the pathogen, and the environment.

Multiple genes used in eyes today had ancestral roles in stress responses.